Electricity Supply Industry Training Organisation

Career Information


Electricity supply careers
Download our brochure: A Career with Energy

Click on the links below for information about different job roles:
Electrician
Line Mechanic
Mechanical Fitter
Cable Jointer
Telecommunications Technician
Operator
Operator (Contact Centre)
Business Administrator
Retail Operator


Civil careers
Download our brochure: A Career with Grit

Click on the links below for information about different job roles:
Civil plant operator
Infrastructure pipelaying technician
Water reticulation technician
Horizontal directional drilling (HDD) operator
Roadmarker
Roading/pavement construction worker
Civil laboratory technician
Survey technician
Civil engineering technician
Rural contractor
Agrichemical applicator


Electrician

In the electricity supply industry electricians work with important often large piece of electrically operated equipment like generators, circuit breakers, transformers and switchgear. You will work on the installation and maintenance of this equipment. You can expect to be out and about working on location at power stations, sub stations, switchyards and other installations where high voltage equipment is used.
Following registration jobs could include:
  • Power technician
  • Metering technician
  • Field switcher
  • Sub station maintainer
More information 
Qualifications for Electricians


Line Mechanic
Line mechanics enjoy a wide variety of challenging and satisfying roles particularly for people who love to work outdoors. They provide an essential service to the community and the country by dealing with emergency repairs to electricity lines. They erect and replace power poles and pylons, splice electricity cables and test lines and circuits. They are also involved in administration, job planning and vegetation control. There is a steady demand in the electricity supply industry for qualified line mechanics and career opportunities abound for those looking for this type of work.

More information
Qualifications for Line Mechanics (Distribution)
Qualifications for Line Mechanics (Transmission)


Mechanical Fitter
In the electricity supply industry, mechanical fitters work with important often large pieces of mechanical equipment like turbines, boilers and generators to produce electricity required for consumers. You will work on the installation, maintenance and repair of this equipment. You can expect to be working in thermal and hydro power stations as well as with new technologies such as wind and geo-thermal sources of energy. Mechanical fitting qualifications include the specialised requirements for working in the electricity supply industry.

More information
Qualifications for Mechanical Fitters


Cable Jointer
Cable Jointers have skills that are in wide demand in the electricity supply industry and can find themselves working in a variety of locations from power stations on the Clutha River to the underground utility services on Queen Street in Auckland. Their role is to work on high voltage electricity cables. They install, join and solder power cables and test and measure the performance of cables and insulation. There is a great deal of individual responsibility making sure that the work is done correctly and safely.

More information
Qualifications for Cable Jointers


Telecommunications Technician
If you are practical, have an eye for detail and enjoy working with technology then this maybe the job for you.
Telecommunications technicians install, maintain and repair electronic communication equipment in telecommunication networks. Generally they work indoor in workshops or offices and on-site when installing new equipment or repairing faults. As the technology of these networks is constantly developing, continuous learning is a characteristic of this occupation.

More information
Qualifications for Telecommunications Technicians


Operator
Operators in the electricity supply industry have a crucial role in controlling the flow of electricity. They work mostly in control rooms with equipment that controls the generation and supply of electricity to consumers. They often work in shifts so that the control operations are maintained 24/7. At times, operators will have to respond to emergencies to ensure that electricity supply is restored quickly. You should expect to be able to work under pressure and within time constraints. Operator positions are usually post apprenticeship so you'll need to have already completed electrical or mechanical qualifications.

More information
Qualifications for Operators


Operator (Contact Centre)
Electricity supply contact centre operators spend their day looking after customers who belong to power companies. They use their customer service skills and knowledge to assist customers with a wide range of queries. As a contact centre operator you will gain knowledge of many aspects of the electricity supply industry from generation to the retailing of power. It is a job for those who enjoy dealing with people. If you like finding solutions for customers and making sure they are happy with the end outcome this may be the job for you.

More information
Qualifications for Operators (Contact Centre)


Business Administrator
Many business administrators are the first contact point between the electricity company and its customers. It is a job for those who enjoy dealing with people and working as part of a team. The job often includes reception duties, phone contact, secretarial tasks and computer work. Administration roles can often led to promotion into management positions. NZQA qualifications are available in business administration as National Certificates and diplomas.

More information
Qualifications for Business Administrators


Retail Operator
The Retail Operations sector consists of three main areas: New connections, switching and meter changes. It is a job for those who enjoy dealing with people and working as part of a team. The job often invokes dealing with service contractors who are on site. In addition, these roles require interaction with the MARIA Registry (Metering and Reconciliation Information Agreement), a form of national database for the electricity supply industry retail sector. This qualification is a stand alone pathway but feeds into the Business Administration Pathway from Level 3.

More information
Qualifications for Retail Operators


Civil plant operator
If you’re into big machinery then you’ve come to the right place! Civil plant operators are highly skilled and use a range of plant and equipment from compactors through to diggers, graders and large motor scrapers. You can work on a range of exciting projects including roading, rail, airports and ports, new subdivisions, and public facilities like water supply and sewage. Plant operators need to have a clean, full current drivers licence along with the relevant licence for different types of machinery they use. Skilled people are in demand, with work available around the country.

More information
Qualifications for Civil Plant Operators
Civil Contractors New Zealand


Infrastructure pipelaying technician
Infrastructure pipelaying technicians are responsible for installing new pipes, fittings and associated structures for services such as gas, potable water, sanitary sewage, storm water and cable ducting. They work in public areas such as roads, but do not cover residential properties. They enjoy a wide variety of work including locating and identifying services, using tools and heavy machinery, and site excavation and reinstatement. Skilled technicians are in demand and career prospects are good. Many pipelayers are multi-skilled and may also work in water reticulation.

More information
Qualifications for Infrastructure Pipelaying Technicians


Water reticulation technician
Water reticulation technicians maintain water pipes and systems in public areas. They are involved in repairing water leaks, installing connections and fittings, removing blockages in wastewater systems, and replacing damaged pipes. Water reticulation technicians may also carry out infrastructure pipelaying work (see above).

More information
Qualifications for Water Reticulation Technicians


Horizontal directional drilling (HDD) operator
Horizontal Directional Drilling (HDD) is technique for installation of new underground utilities such as communications, water, wastewater and electricity. It works by drilling along an underground bore path using a surface-launched drilling rig, with minimal impact on the surrounding area. People working in HDD can work as a driller or tracker, and may progress become a site supervisor. Career prospects are good and skilled people are in demand – especially for installing Ultra-Fast Broadband.

More information
Qualifications for HDD Operators
Australasian Society for Trenchless Technology


Roadmarker
Roadmarking is an essential part of the roading network, and requires skilled, trained people to make sure it’s done correctly and safely. Roadmarkers are responsible for locating and setting out sites and preparing materials such as paint and raised markers. They also use a wide range of machinery and equipment to apply new roadmarkings and re-paint existing markings. Traffic control is an important part of the role, as roadmarking is often carried out in live traffic situations. It is also often carried out at night, so shift work is required.

More information
Qualifications for Roadmarkers
New Zealand Roadmarkers Federation Inc.


Roading/pavement construction worker
Roading and pavement construction workers are involved in maintaining the many thousands of kilometres of existing roads and streets, and constructing new roads and motorways. Pavement surfacing is a specialist sector with opportunities to gain skills in asphalt and chipseal application, plant and paving machine operation, bitumen spraying, surfacing production and design. There is a wide variety of work from rural to urban areas.

More information
Qualifications for Roading/Pavement Construction Workers
Civil Contractors New Zealand


Civil laboratory technician
Civil laboratory technicians provide a vital service for engineers in the design and quality control of projects. They use a range of equipment to carry out tests on site ground conditions and the durability of construction materials. These tests are carried out in the laboratory and out in the field. Technicians compile and analyse the information which is provided to engineers and project managers. They are also involved in troubleshooting and problem solving, as well as developing and implementing quality systems for testing.

More information
Qualifications for civil laboratory technicians
Civil Engineering Testing Association of New Zealand 


Survey technician
Survey technicians are involved in a diverse range of work such as cadastral surveys, site investigation, mapping, civil construction projects, resource management and geographic information systems. They use high-tech survey equipment to take and record measurements on site, collect and process data, make calculations and observations, interpret plans for land use, and prepare and analyse reports. 

More information
Qualifications for Survey technicians
New Zealand Institute of Surveyors


Civil engineering technician
Civil engineering technicians assist professional engineers in designing and building infrastructure such as roads, bridges and buildings. If you want to become a civil engineering technician you can study towards the New Zealand Diploma in Engineering (NZDE) at an accredited polytechnic. Another option is to take up an industry cadetship, so you can gain work experience and study at the same time. Civil engineering is one of the most in-demand careers in New Zealand. There is an acute shortage of skilled, qualified people, and civil engineers are on the immediate skills shortage list with Immigration New Zealand.

More information
Qualifications for civil engineering technicians
Institution of Professional Engineers New Zealand (IPENZ) 
New Zealand Board of Engineering Diplomas (NZBED)


Rural contractor
Agriculture is the backbone of the New Zealand economy and throughout the country there are a wide range of opportunities in rural contracting. Land development, drainage, tree and hedge trimming, constructing farm tracks and dams and preparing farm building sites are just some of the contracting work carried out. Then there are opportunities to operate today’s sophisticated agricultural machinery for cultivating, planting and harvesting crops.

More information
Qualifications for rural contractors
Rural Contractors New Zealand


Agrichemical applicator
Agrichemical applicators are involved in the safe handling, transportation and application of chemicals. They may work in agriculture and horticulture, for example in farms, vineyards and orchards, as well as in civil infrastructure - spraying roadside hedges, verges and residential sections. There is scope to become a Registered Chemical Applicator, as well as opportunities to learn a wide range of management skills and own a contracting business.

More information
Qualifications for agrichemical applicators
Rural Contractors New Zealand
Growsafe